Skip to Content

Criterium Engineers

Client Spotlight: Atlantic FCU & 600 Sable Oaks

Latest "Engineering Advisor" Article - Fri, 03/27/2020 - 12:27

Congratulations to our client, Atlantic Federal Credit Union (FCU), on their recent purchase of a 100,000 square foot building located at 600 Sable Oaks Drive in South Portland, Maine. This will be their new company headquarters, which they plan to move into later this year.

More than 80,000 square feet of the building is occupied by four national insurance companies. According to media reports, Atlantic FCU will occupy the remaining 16,000 square feet. They are now Maine’s largest credit union.

Prior to the building purchase, Atlantic FCU engaged with Criterium Engineers to perform a commercial building inspection on the property, which is located near from the Maine Mall.

Our licensed, Professional Engineers, perform commercial building inspections for commercial realtors and prospective building owners located across the United States and in Ontario.

Inspections encompass a facility’s overall condition, focus on all the critical building components (structural, roof, electrical, plumbing, air and heating, paving, drainage, etc.), environmental factors (including air flow and insulation) and safety issues – fire and other potential hazards.

Contact us to learn more.

The post Client Spotlight: Atlantic FCU & 600 Sable Oaks appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Austin Landing: Our Largest-ever Cost Segregation Study

Latest "Engineering Advisor" Article - Thu, 03/26/2020 - 13:49

Criterium Engineers recently completed our largest-ever cost segregation study at Austin Landing, an 800,000+ square foot, 60-acre, mixed-use complex located in the Cincinnati-Dayton, Ohio corridor.

Austin Landing is the “go to” hub for entertainment, shopping and eating in Miamisburg, Ohio. It also offers hotel lodging, apartments, a grocery store, and offices.

A cost segregation study is a tool used to lower taxes, increase cash flow and maximize the tax benefits of leasing or owning commercial property. It provides improved cash flow through reclassification of the property’s asset lives. The purpose is accelerating depreciation expenses and thus lowering Federal taxes. At Criterium Engineers, we specialize in cost segregation studies.

When our client bought the Austin Landing complex last November, the Dayton Daily News called it a $134M “Crown Jewel” property. It also notes that the complex was launched in 2010 and greatly expanded in 2012.

Want to learn how a cost segregation study may work for your property? Contact us today.

The post Austin Landing: Our Largest-ever Cost Segregation Study appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Keep Absent Owners Part of the Community

Latest "Common Foundations" Article - Thu, 03/19/2020 - 11:25
Welcome Home!

Maine is often called Vacationland due to the population explosion in the summer months. This traditional influx of people not only affects coastal tourist towns and inland lake villages but also condo communities. Whether your condo is self- or professionally managed, establishing policies and planning for returning snowbirds is critical to the successful transition of these return bi-latitude owners.

Mobile association members present both a challenge and an opportunity for the property manager and the board. Effectively run condominium organizations have long recognized the need for good communications and relationships. Communities with long-term absentee owners need to pay particular attention to this fundamental principle and be sure they are sending the right “message” throughout the year.

“Wish you were here!”

Absentee owners want to feel that they and their interests are being included in association life just the same as when they are present. While they may be too busy with their life away to “write you back,” they will certainly appreciate being kept in the information loop, so be sure to keep your mailing and emailing lists updated with summer and winter addresses.

Good communications build good relationships. When a board makes a decision it can not only have a significant impact on the owners’ financial well being but also their quality of life. Each owner may be affected differently. For a bard to be effective it must have the owners’ trust. This is especially true with owners “from away.”

This trust comes into play when owners’ votes must be cast long-distance. Though many Maine condominiums host their annual meetings in August to net the largest attendance possible, various types of owners’ participation may be required in other parts of the year. Confidence in the board is essential to make this work. The most certain way to communicate the board’s effectiveness is by clearly demonstrating the use of proven management controls and tools.

“We’re holding down the fort!”

One of the most effective tools in managing an association’s assets is a reserve study. A reserve study provides a clear plan on how the condominium’s common elements will be managed into the future, how much that will cost, when the funds will be needed, and how those funds will be raised. When reserve studies are followed and are kept up-to-date, an absent owner will feel that his or her interests are being looked after. The owner will know that deferred maintenance will not be piling up, that the good reputation of the condominium is being maintained in the real estate market, and thus, the owner’s investment is being protected.

To make the most of such a tool, it is important to make its value visible to the owners. Some associations produce a large copy of the reserve study’s listing of future repair projects. This poster-sized timeline projection is then posted in a highly trafficked location such as the clubhouse or laundry room and the status of each project is noted with color markers. This presents a very visible reminder that the board is doing its job.

“Welcome back!”

If yours is a community with unit owners living elsewhere for part of the year, many may own a condo in another part of the country. These owners have experiences with how other condo associations handle issues, which can be invaluable to you. To not take advantage of this resource, or not use this networking possibility with other boards, could be costly in lessons missed.

One idea is a “Welcome Back” social/business meeting for hearing the experiences of your returning unit owners with their other condo associations. The positive stories can provide you with best practices input. The negative anecdotes can serve to increase owners’ appreciation for how well you are managing their Maine association—and perhaps provide reinforcement of why it is important to “stay the course” in areas where necessary decisions may be unpopular.

Committee participation is another way to draw owners into the workings of the association. Though short-stay owners may not want to get too involved, subcommittees can be developed to allow them to handle seasonal issues such as outdoor activities, summer ground maintenance, etc.

When some owners complain that they want to know more of what is going on, invite them to the next board meeting or, better yet, ask them to recommend a communication method that would work for them. Turn the problem into the solution. The goal is to let the owners get as involved as they wish—or feel comfortable enough to just kick off their sandals and enjoy a Downeast summer.

Article written by Jack Carr, P.E., R.S., LEED-AP, Criterium Engineers
Published in Condo Media March 2020 edition
Download a PDF Version of this Condo Media Article

The post Keep Absent Owners Part of the Community appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Association Liabilities — Ignorance is not Bliss

Latest "Common Foundations" Article - Thu, 02/20/2020 - 15:20

So what keeps you up at night? If you are a condo board member or a property manager, it might be that dreaded phone call reporting calamity at the condominium. Whether it is the report of a fire; or a frozen sprinkler leak; or an injury due to a common element failure, the association’s actions in the past, in the present, or in the future will determine the ultimate outcome of association liabilities.

Condominium associations can assume a wide range of liabilities in this litigious environment we live and this article will not address most of these occurrences such as employee or third party lawsuits; violations of board fiscal responsibilities; and failure to follow administrative directives found in the condo declaration documents, to name just a few. Instead, this article will focus solely on Breach of Duty issues associated with common or limited common elements that could have been foreseen or avoided with proper attention by the community leaders.

Water Infiltration

One of the most common problems facing any building complex is water. Moisture infiltration through the building envelope can develop in virtually any type of structure. Keep in mind the building envelope includes not just the roof surface and exterior wall siding but also windows and doors as well as the foundation itself. Water infiltration takes as many forms as there are states of water, that is, moisture damage can be caused by free running water, ice, steam, and vapor. One of the most important issues to remember is water in any form requires time to cause damage. A short duration wetting rarely caused serious or extensive damage.

A vigilant condo board will have in place protocols and procedures to discover the first signs of water problems through the use of routine building inspection of the common areas and a population of unit owners informed on how to advise the board on water problems in their units. The condo’s building maintenance plan will require a visual inspection of all roof surfaces after any wind event over 50 miles per hour or hail or ice storms. Common area basements and crawlspaces should be viewed after extended rain events. All unit owners should be warned about freezing pipes and sprinkler systems. This is especially true for communities with a large proportion of snow birds taking extended vacations during the winter months. Requirements for low temperature alarms; minimum year-round thermostat settings; and hot water overflow pans should be well understood by all owners.

There should be a guideline in place for what actions are needed when a building envelope water infiltration problem is reported. The action needs to be timely and documented with the issue directed to a pre-determined individual who has the knowledge to understand the seriousness of the problem and the authority to act.

Perils of Poor Maintenance

An example of what can go wrong can be illustrated by the recent case of a relatively new four-story condominium building with a flat rubber membrane roof in Portland, Maine. The top floor unit owner observed some signs of interior wall water stains on the north side of the building. The problem was reported to the property manager who advised the board to hire a roofer to inspect the roof. As the water infiltration appeared to come and go with the way the wind blew, the board felt the problem could be put off as there were more pressing projects. Time passes before the unit owner hires his own building inspector who discovers a tear in a roof membrane seam was allowing water to enter the exterior wall cavity. Further invasive inspection of the exterior wall revealed that not only was the wall oriented strand board (OSB) siding beginning to rot but most of that side of the building’s fiberglass insulation was water saturated and the sheetrock walls had significant mold contamination requiring the unit owner’s family to move out of the unit during the mitigation and costly repair project. All would agree this was an avoidable liability for the condo, if prompt action had been taken.

Similarly, if a unit owner reports recent sheetrock cracks or door molding seams opening and doors not closing properly, the board should not assume it is a unit owner’s responsibility to repair. The interior walls may not be a common element, but the causes of the reported problems may relate directly to a common element such as the foundation or building framing. Taking all such reports seriously will show the owners their concerns are being listened to and potentially head off a widespread global problem throughout the entire complex.

Trip and fall hazards should also be taken seriously to avoid Duty of Care liability. Whether it is missing tiles on the swimming pool deck; damaged carpet in the halls or stairways; or the depressed asphalt pavement that ponds and freezes every winter, these problems are usually well known before the accident happens. You do not want to be the board member in front of the judge when he asks you how easy would it have been to repair the tripping hazard. And don’t forget the hidden fire hazards such as uncleaned common dryer vent ducts or lapsed inspections of the sprinkler system. Don’t depend on hindsight when it comes to risk management.

Article written by Jack Carr, P.E., R.S., LEED-AP, Criterium Engineers
Published in Condo Media February 2020 edition
Download a PDF Version of this Condo Media Article

The post Association Liabilities — Ignorance is not Bliss appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Congratulations to Our Client: The New School, a New York City University

Latest "Engineering Advisor" Article - Mon, 01/20/2020 - 17:40

Stuyvesant Park Residence

The New School is a world renowned, progressive university, founded in 1919, with its main campus in New York City. They house a design school, liberal arts college, performing arts college, and graduate programs. Students collaborate across disciplines and learn new ways of creative problem solving to effect positive change in the world.

Officials at the university recently asked Criterium Engineers to perform a Pre-Lease Property Condition Assessment (PCA) on a 12-story, 16,000+ square foot dormitory building—which is known as the Stuyvesant Park Residence, located at 318 East 15th Street in New York City. The building was built as a hospital dormitory in 1965 and has served as a student residence since 2009 with 140 apartments.

A pre-lease PCA is especially helpful for Triple-Net lease negotiations. The average building PCA reviews more than 30 major building and site elements in great detail. It provides descriptions, deficiencies and recommendations. It also includes probable costs for repair or replacement of damaged or failing building systems or safety issues. PCA reports are customized for each client and may be designed to focus on areas that otherwise may not be covered in a baseline assessment.

 

The post Congratulations to Our Client: The New School, a New York City University appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

How to Hire a Condo Engineer: 4 Steps

Latest "Common Foundations" Article - Mon, 01/06/2020 - 16:41
Make sure you actually need one, too

They don’t teach you how to hire an engineer in school. Indeed most folks have never had the occasion to hire an engineer or an architect in their whole life. This is also true for most condominium or HOA board members. So how does a condo board go about successfully hiring the right engineering firm for their upcoming project?

1. Evaluate the Need

Perhaps the first question to be asked is ‘do we even need an engineer?’ Not all projects do. Some repair projects are so straight forward and obvious the board can hire a contractor with the proper skills and run the project by a committee chair or a property manager who has expressed confidence she’s managed many similar repair projects. Some projects requiring some engineering expertise, such as replacing the common HVAC equipment or upgrading the common electrical systems, do not need an engineer to manage it but rather the right choice by the board would be to seek an HVAC or electrical contractor capable of providing ‘design/ build’ services for both a timely and economically satisfactory project.

The complexity of the project and criteria needed to be complied will determine whether an engineer is needed. Typical projects in this category will include designing a new storm water drainage system for the entire HOA; performing a reserve fund study; or evaluating and design of a new foundation for one or more buildings in the condo complex. It should be noted, the term ‘engineer’ in this article refers to a professional engineer (P.E.) licensed in the state of Maine. Though other unlicensed engineers can work on the project, only a licensed engineer can stamp (preliminary and final) construction documents for town planning board review; building permits; and other municipal requirements.

2. Selecting the Engineer

Once the need is determined, selecting an engineer is the next major step. The process starts with defining the project with a clear and complete description of the scope of work. Many property managers have the resources to provide considerable assistance to the board in developing this scope of work. While the scope of work is being prepared, a list of two or three engineering firm should be created. Clearly this list should be made up of engineering firms providing the services needed for the subject project. Here again the condo’s property manager can be a good source of finding the right firms. Similarly, engineers listed in the Condo Media’s directory can make this task relatively easy because the engineers listed will be firms with experience in not only the technical issues involved but also are familiar with the world of condominiums and their special needs.

3. Preparing the RFP

Once the potential list of firms is developed, a Request for Proposal (RFP) can be prepared. This document will utilized the defined scope of work to ensure all interested parties are preparing their responses with a similar understanding of the board’s objectives. Typical RFP’s have four major elements:

1) General Information for the Engineer
2) Technical Requirements
3) Criteria for Selection
4) Scope of Work Statement

On some projects it may necessary to invite the potential firms to visit the site for a tour to outline the issues or special conditions impossible to clearly delineate in the RFP. Following the distribution of the RFP to the listed firms, the board will screen the proposal responses; select firms it wishes to interview; and schedule the interviews (45 minutes to 1 hour) to allow both the engineering firm and the board to clarify any questions or concerns arising during the proposal preparation process.

4. The Interview and Contract Process

This interviewing process is most important. Typically, the principal or senior member of the engineering firm attends the interview giving the board a first-hand impression of the firm’s approach to this project; a clear commitment to the technical resources available for this project; and past relevant experience predicting a likely successful outcome. The interview also allows the engineering firm a better understanding of how the board will be making decisions and committing adequate representation to ensure proper administration of the project.

Following this interview the board should select it first choice for the project’s engineer. At that time the contract is negotiated. Often the contract is a direct reflection of the requirements of the RFP and the conditions and fee found in the engineering firm’s proposal. These negotiations on occasion will result in changes to the scope of work and the fee. If agreement cannot be reached on issues acceptable to the board, the board can begin discussions with their second engineering firm choice in order to feel comfortable with their selection. It is critical the board feels they have selected a firm they can work with and have confidence future communications and project outcome will meet their community’s needs.

Awarding the contract to the successful engineering firm is only the beginning. A kick-off meeting to introduce all of the project team members on both sides; a review of everyone’s obligations; and establish a clear line of authority and communications. In starting any major project, the board should always remember that just like dealing with a lawyer or a doctor, the engineer’s job is to provide competent technical information and solutions but it is the board’s responsibility to make the business’ decisions. History has shown a well- defined scope of work coupled with a board making timely decisions is a recipe for a successful project.

Article written by Jack Carr, P.E., R.S., LEED-AP, Criterium Engineers
Published in Condo Media January 2020 edition
Download a PDF Version of this Condo Media Article

The post How to Hire a Condo Engineer: 4 Steps appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Is Your Condo Breathing? Why Building Ventilation is Critical

Latest "Common Foundations" Article - Fri, 12/06/2019 - 12:17

If your condo board is planning for a re-roofing project, remind the board the project will not be a success without an in-depth consideration being given to the condition of the building ventilation under the roof. Inadequate attic venting will cause ice dams; energy loss; and moisture damage to the roof structure. Too often roof re-surface projects only repeat the mistakes of the past.

A proper roof project includes a review of the capacity of the soffit and ridge vents based on the new codes; reducing penetrations through the internal vapor barrier; and increasing the attic floor insulation to meet today’s energy standards. This review may best be done by an engineer familiar with the appropriate building science and not by the low roofing bidder.

Seasonal Considerations

We all need to vent. No, I am not talking about Monday morning venting about the bum calls the referee made during the big game. I am talking about venting the attic space in your condominium. I know, most folks think venting is a summer issue, so why talk about it when the snow is on the ground? It is true that an attic only needs one tenth the ventilation in the winter than in the summer to control moisture buildup and temperature, but the winter time also has some unique issues.

First of all, if you or the condominium building committee wants to inspect attics, it is a lot easier on all concerned to be inspecting a cold attic than being in an attic on an August afternoon. Secondly, if repairs are needed, it is better to plan in the winter so that your bid documents are ready for the spring and summer construction season scheduling flurry. Finally, cold weather brings ice dams and heat loss due to poor insulation which are both directly related to ventilation problems.

Building Ventilation Best Practices

There are a lot of myths about what makes good ventilation in an attic. It is not true that rising hot air venting through ridge or gable vents is the best natural ventilation. This is sometimes called gravity ventilation. Tests have shown this chimney effect is negligible when compared to wind movement which has a much higher efficiency and allows for considerably smaller net venting area to be successful.

The difficulty with relying on wind movement is that areas of high and low pressure will change with wind direction thus existing buildings are dependent on the design of the building and its orientation for determining the type and location of vents. The best designs have the outlet as high as possible, such as a ridge vent, and the inlet as low as possible such as the soffit area. To improve this air flow, air chutes are often installed during initial construction or later retrofitted. These chutes are formed plastic channels that are attached to the roof joists and are butted up to the soffit vents to act as a pathway conduit for air coming through the soffit vents. They also serve as a barrier to prevent the attic insulation from clogging the soffit vents.

Soffit vents are probably the most important of all vents as they can act as both an inlet and outlet for air flow. That is why it is imperative they be kept free of debris or other material that could clog the vents. Without soffit venting the ridge or high gable vents would draw make-up air through the ceiling instead of from outside. For this reason the soffit vent should have at least 50 percent of the vent free area (NFA). This NFA rating is stamped on vent products. A rule of thumb is that the summer ventilation requirement can be estimated by determining the volume of attic space and dividing by 2 which will produce the needed cubic feet per minute (cfm) of ventilation.

When selecting replacement vents always seek vents that will have low air flow resistance. They come in either perforated or slotted. The slotted has a reputation of resist clogging by airborne debris. Some ridge vents come with baffles which are designed to draw air out due to the suction developed.

As we discussed, venting needs in the winter are often different for the summer. Winter ventilation is needed to remove attic moisture arising from the living space. It has been found that a great deal of moisture from as low as wet basements and crawlspaces can travel through the house’s floor penetrations serving plumbing and electrical piping. This moist air can then cool its water vapor and condense onto roof sheathing. A well ventilated attic will produce a more uniform temperature across the roof sheathing and thus minimizes warm spots near the eaves that create ice dams from cyclical refreezing of snow or rain on the roof.

In summer, of course, the main problem from poor attic ventilation is heat. Ninety degree weather can create temperature of over 150 degrees in an attic. Heat kills. It can kill your air conditioning budget and reduce the lifespan of an asphalt shingle roof by one half its rated life. So if you start having cabin fever, make sure you vent.

Article written by Jack Carr, P.E., R.S., LEED-AP, Criterium Engineers
Published in Condo Media December 2019 edition
Download a PDF Version of this Condo Media Article

The post Is Your Condo Breathing? Why Building Ventilation is Critical appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Cam Grant Achieves Reserve Specialist Credential

Latest "Common Foundations" Article - Thu, 11/21/2019 - 16:19

V. Campbell “Cam” Grant, P.E, at Criterium Engineers is a familiar face for many of our clients, especially those who represent Homeowner Associations. We’re pleased to announce that Cam recently achieved the Community Association Institute’s (CAI) Reserve Specialist (RS®) designation.

The CAI website notes that this designation is awarded to qualified reserve specialists who, through years of specialized experience, can help ensure that community associations prepare their reserve budgets as accurately as possible. Community associations rely on qualified reserve specialists to assist them in extensive reserve planning to keep their communities running smoothly. Reserve Specialists must adhere to CAI’s strict code of ethics.

The post Cam Grant Achieves Reserve Specialist Credential appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Featured Project: Children’s Museum of Maine

Latest "Engineering Advisor" Article - Thu, 11/21/2019 - 15:23
Congratulations to our client, Cyrus Hagge of Project Management, Inc., on the recent sale of the Children’s Museum of Maine, a landmark building at 142 Free Street in Portland, Maine. The museum building was sold to the Portland Museum of Art, located next door. This MaineBiz article features details about the sale. Criterium Engineers performed a Commercial Building Inspection and an Environmental Site Assessment on the 19,158-square-foot mixed-use building.

The post Featured Project: Children’s Museum of Maine appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Want to Avoid Unexpected Property Maintenance Costs? Hint: Plan for Your Commercial Property’s Future

Latest "Engineering Advisor" Article - Thu, 11/21/2019 - 12:56

Whether you are a building owner, property manager, REIT manager—or if you are questioning whether a building purchase makes financial sense—it’s important to anticipate how the property will perform over time.

For retail, multi-family, office or industrial properties, the best solution is to assess, plan and budget for the future. A Capital Needs Assessment analyzes the building’s capital improvement needs and predicts likely repair and replacement costs over a specified period—usually 20 years. The report provides both a cumulative, life-of-the-building cost projection and a year-by-year estimate of repair and replacement costs. A Capital Needs Assessment is offered both as a stand-alone service and as an adjunct to a Property Condition Assessment, which starts with a detailed analysis of a building’s current physical condition.

Why perform a Capital Needs Assessment?
  • Evaluate the current condition of your assets;
  • Identify immediate needs;
  • Plan for repairs or replacement of major systems; and,
  • Develop a budget to plan for upcoming years.
Examples of Capital Needs Assessment focus areas:
  • Site, parking facilities and pavement
  • Structure and roof
  • Plumbing and mechanical facilities
  • Electrical systems
  • Fire safety and ADA accessibility
  • Hazardous Materials

Planning ahead for any building owner is critical. Our licensed, Professional Engineers are building experts. Together, they have inspected over 750,000 buildings in our 62+ year history and understand how buildings and building components perform. They understand the factors that may make some components fail sooner or last longer than expected. Our building science expertise and our decades of field inspection experience make our capital needs assessments educated and realistic.

Contact Criterium Engineers to request a proposal today, tell us what you need, and we’ll tell you how we can help. The information our engineers provide can help answer your questions and plan for your building’s future.

Note: Additional information about capital needs assessments and maintenance planning may be found here.

The post Want to Avoid Unexpected Property Maintenance Costs? Hint: Plan for Your Commercial Property’s Future appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Black or White? Weighing New Roofing Decisions

Latest "Common Foundations" Article - Wed, 10/09/2019 - 16:10

Some board members may think deciding about a new roof surface is over their heads (forgive the pun). Condominium board members and property managers of urban mid and high-rise buildings often face flat roof maintenance issues and now a new wrinkle in the roofing decision process has arisen: black or white.

In the recent past most flat roofs were made with a rubber-like elastomeric membrane called EPDM. Though black EPDM still accounts for the majority of flat membrane roofs for condo, commercial, and industrial buildings in the northern states, you will see things are changing just by looking out an airplane window as you approach a major airport to see the roof landscape below turning white.

“Cool” Roofs?
Cool roofs are designed to reduce energy consumption and reduce what is commonly called the urban heat island effect. Cool roofs are categorized into three basis types: white, reflective coated, or green (vegetated) roofs. White roofs are the most common with TPO (thermoplastic polyolefin) and PVC (polyvinyl chloride) being the typical choices. Though PVC and TPO roofs have the same wear and cost factors, PVC materials have some negative characteristics, such as high toxicity and un-recyclability, so for ease of comparing black to white we will only consider EPDM vs. TPO in our comparison discussions.

Comparing Options
To start with TPO roof membranes are recognized to have longer lives lasting on average 25 years compared to EPDM lasting 20 years. This is in some part due to TPO’s resistance to UV and thermal expansion damage. Some TPO products developed bad reputations in the past due to their inability to handle severe cold which in some cases caused the membrane to shatter. These problems are reported to have been eliminated with today’s TPO roofing materials.

Secondly, the initial cost favors EPDM roofs.  However, when life cycle and energy cost issues are considered the black and white roofs become competitive. Installation methods differ in that EPDM seams are taped or adhesively sealed while TPO seams are welded by a thermal process.

There are strong forces pushing the general acceptance of white roofs in the future.  States such as California have passed laws in 2005 requiring the use of reflective roofing materials as well as individual cities such as Chicago establishing building codes to favor its use. There is a body of evidence developing showing the heat island effect of black surfaces, which include not just roofs but also parking lots, paved roads, and building facades, can have an impact on local weather characteristics.

The nation’s largest green building advocates are influencing architects and building owners by favorably rating buildings with cool roofs. Under the joint program of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE) for a roofing product to receive an Energy Star label under its Roof Product Program it must have a solar reflectivity of at least 0.65 and weathered reflectance of at least 0.50 in accordance with EPA testing procedures.

Going Green
The Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) has created a rating system for measuring and reporting the solar reflectance and thermal emittance of 850 roofing products and provides this to energy service providers, building code bodies, architects and specifiers, property owners, and community planners. The Green Building Initiative has instituted its Green Globe system in the US and Canada to develop benchmark criteria for a building’s likely energy consumption as a result of roofing material’s solar reflectance and thermal emittance.

The US Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system is now widely used for most publicly funded building projects and many high profile non-government buildings as a result of legislation, executive orders, resolutions, ordinances, policies and tax incentives. Architects seeking a LEED certification for their project will receive credit for white, cool roofing meeting LEED solar reflective index guidelines.

Winter Penalty?
So with all of this horse power pushing for cool roofs, it seems like an easy black or white decision for the condo board facing a roof replacement project. Maybe not. For northern condos the problem is a little complicated. CRRC admits to a “winter penalty” when cool roofs are installed in northern climates. DOE building modeling data reveal that in the north heating is a much more significant factor in energy use than cooling. In fact, heating accounts for 29% of energy used compared to only 6% for cooling.

It turns out that insulation is a more important element for energy efficiency than cool roofs here in New England.  It has to do with the amount of Heating Degree Days (HDD) and Cooling Degree Days (CDD). As an example, Boston has 5,841 HDD and 646 CDD as compared to Albuquerque’s 4,361 HDD and 1,211 CDD.  Therefore using DOE’s cool roof calculator, Boston’s high number of HDD’s and positive winter heat gain results in lower energy usage and fewer carbon emissions with an EPDM roof. So talk with your roof consultant and remain cool.

Article written by Jack Carr, P.E., R.S., LEED-AP, Criterium Engineers
Published in Condo Media October 2019 edition

Download a PDF Version of this Condo Media Article

The post Black or White? Weighing New Roofing Decisions appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Congratulations to Our Client: Australia-based Orora Group

Latest "Engineering Advisor" Article - Tue, 10/08/2019 - 15:06

Congratulations to our client the Orora Group, based in Australia, on their recent lease of warehouse #200 at 1905 110th Street in Grand Prairie, Texas. Criterium Engineers performed a Pre-Lease Property Condition Assessment on the 102,000 square foot warehouse building.

Orora Group works closely with its customers to provide an extensive range of tailored packaging solutions and displays. From glass bottles to boxes to packaging equipment and more, they are total packaging solutions specialists. Orora Group operates in seven countries and has more than 6,800 team members.

The post Congratulations to Our Client: Australia-based Orora Group appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Commercial Building Inspections: Why You Should Hire an Engineer Versus a Building Inspector

Latest "Engineering Advisor" Article - Tue, 10/08/2019 - 14:26

For every real estate transaction that you are involved in—chances are—as part of the due-diligence process you are hiring a commercial building inspection professional to inspect the property. This is a helpful and valuable service that you routinely recommend to clients any may be required by lenders, however if the inspection is not done objectively and carefully, it may lead to major issues.

Whether you need a commercial building inspection or the gold-standard property condition assessment, the inspection is a critical step in the process—and you need an experienced expert on your side.

The term “building inspector” is often a self-issued title and, with the exception of a few states, there is very little regulation in this rapidly growing industry. On the other hand, Professional Engineers are licensed by the state in which they practice, and they:

  • Have completed an accredited, degreed engineering program;
  • Have four years of work under the direction of other engineers;
  • Passed a comprehensive two-day exam;
  • Are bound by a code of ethics and state law to practice only in areas where they are qualified.

Professional Engineers Can Save Time & Money

By law in most states, only a licensed, Professional Engineer is permitted to render an opinion as to the structural integrity of a building. A building inspector may be qualified to find the symptoms that a building presents (i.e., there is a crack), but then must suggest the consulting services of a licensed, Professional Engineer for further evaluation. This can be an expensive and time delaying addition to the inspection process. Hiring a building inspector who is a licensed, Professional Engineer, in the first place, can save your client additional consulting fees and valuable time.

Professional Engineers Are Insured

Another important aspect is that licensed, Professional Engineers maintain comprehensive professional liability insurance with nationally recognized insurance carriers. As licensed, Professional Engineers, we strive to deliver on our promises. In the event of an error or oversight, having professional liability coverage means we have the financial means to back up our work.

Professional Engineers Are Legally Accountable

The most important quality is the accountability as Professional Engineers. They stand behind their work and are legally and ethically accountable.

Whether your clients are large corporations, real estate investment trusts or individual investors, engaging with licensed, Professional Engineers will give your clients the peace of mind that they are getting the most professional advice available.

At Criterium Engineers we have more than 60 years of experience inspecting tens of thousands of commercial projects across the country. Our inspectors are licensed, Professional Engineers with years of building-related experience. They are further trained by Criterium Engineers to provide inspections and must participate in peer review and continuing education programs. Our commercial building inspection reports provide a detailed summary of our findings, highlighting building strengths as well as any identifying weaknesses or potential problems. We clearly explain a building’s condition, so our clients can make confident, informed decisions about their purchase.

The post Commercial Building Inspections: Why You Should Hire an Engineer Versus a Building Inspector appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Vinyl Siding – or Not

Latest "Your Home" Article - Thu, 08/29/2019 - 15:39

Perhaps you are on the Building Committee which has been charged by your Homeowners Association Board to recommend a replacement siding material for your 35 year old condo. Perhaps you are a property manager whose in-basket is filled with unit owner complaints about vinyl clapboard siding problems in the new condo complex. Whatever the vinyl façade issue is, the future solutions may surprise you.

Vinyl siding materials are everywhere. It is probably the most common façade material in all its forms used on condominiums across the nation, and for good reason. It is quick to install; it is relatively inexpensive; and has an estimated useful life of over 40 years. Most of its negatives are well understood: it can crack or break from hail or your grandkids hockey pucks; it can make noise when it’s windy or too hot; colors fade or become chalky over time; and frequent cleaning is required. However, these may not be the issues you may face with vinyl siding.

Solar Attack

This problem can fall in the unintended consequences category. With the issuance of the new building energy codes and the drive to reduce our heating costs and carbon footprint, we are melting our vinyl siding. This is happening due to the installation of the new low-E, highly insulated glass windows being installed in both new buildings and replacement windows.

The thermal layers and reflective properties of these high-tech windows cause sun rays to bounce off and reflect onto adjacent vinyl siding clad buildings causing the siding to buckle; warp; or melt. These new window surfaces act like magnifying glasses concentrating the solar energy on a vinyl surface that cannot tolerate heat over 150 degrees Fahrenheit. This condition can occur when a window on the south elevation of the building is near a right angle corner wall covered in vinyl siding. It can even occur when a new commercial building is built across the street and its new glass wall façade faces the sun and reflects across the street to your vinyl sided property.

So what are you to do? This problem was rare in the past but now solar damage is occurring with increasing frequency due to the drive to install low-E windows. The Vinyl Siding Institute suggests placing awning or shades over the windows and even changing the landscaping to create shade trees to block the light. Some vinyl siding manufacturers are addressing this type of solar damage by adding a ‘thermal diffusion agent’ to the vinyl mix at the factory to help reflect and resist the heat build-up.

Manufacturers are also responding to the problem with vinyl siding by excluding solar refection or melt damage from their warranties. Their warranties always excluded damage from heat sources such as gas grills placed too close to the exterior wall, but now damage from reflective windows is recognized so it would be wise to read the fine print before selecting a siding brand.

Color Fading

This increasing problem is a sub-set of the solar melting problem. Whether it be due to window reflective energy; climate change; or changes in manufacturing, color fading complaints are becoming more prevalent. In the past, color fade was protected with a lifetime warranty by the manufacturer.

In the past, this warranty issue would be handled by a siding replacement policy. Now, some manufacturers are offering a ‘restore’ process instead of replacement. The ‘restore’ process would allow the manufacturer to paint the siding with an acrylic paint often applied by specialist painting contractors. This restore process comes with a 10-year warranty, down from the prior ‘limited-lifetime’ color warranty. Here again, read the fine print before signing the contract.

Installation

Vinyl siding may be quick to install, but it is not easy, if it is done right. Vinyl siding has an integral vinyl tab at the top in which an oval hole is punched at set intervals along its length to allow a nail to be driven through this hole and into the sheathing. Sounds simple, but it is not. The manufacturer specification requires the installer to drive the nail head within 1/32th of the vapor barrier/ sheathing surface so as not to bind the thermal movement of the siding.

Keep in mind the fasteners are being driven by an adjustable nail gun requiring a level of skill to properly set the nails in each slot hole without touching the vinyl. This accuracy requirement, coupled with today’s reduced numbers of skilled construction personnel, makes this a quality control challenge. If fastener binding does occur, the siding will not properly move with thermal expansion and buckling will soon appear on the surface.

So the answer to today’s vinyl siding problems: do your research. Read the manufacturer’s specifications and warranties; ensure your contractor is committed to good supervision of the installation of this important building envelope element; and finally, follow up with your own quality verification program, either through your building committee or project engineer. The siding is only as good as it is installed.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Article written by Jack Carr, P.E., R.S., LEED-AP, Criterium Engineers
Published in Condo Media September 2019 edition

Download a PDF Version of this Condo Media Article

The post Vinyl Siding – or Not appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Vinyl Siding – or Not

Latest "Common Foundations" Article - Thu, 08/29/2019 - 15:39

Perhaps you are on the Building Committee which has been charged by your Homeowners Association Board to recommend a replacement siding material for your 35 year old condo. Perhaps you are a property manager whose in-basket is filled with unit owner complaints about vinyl clapboard siding problems in the new condo complex. Whatever the vinyl façade issue is, the future solutions may surprise you.

Vinyl siding materials are everywhere. It is probably the most common façade material in all its forms used on condominiums across the nation, and for good reason. It is quick to install; it is relatively inexpensive; and has an estimated useful life of over 40 years. Most of its negatives are well understood: it can crack or break from hail or your grandkids hockey pucks; it can make noise when it’s windy or too hot; colors fade or become chalky over time; and frequent cleaning is required. However, these may not be the issues you may face with vinyl siding.

Solar Attack

This problem can fall in the unintended consequences category. With the issuance of the new building energy codes and the drive to reduce our heating costs and carbon footprint, we are melting our vinyl siding. This is happening due to the installation of the new low-E, highly insulated glass windows being installed in both new buildings and replacement windows.

The thermal layers and reflective properties of these high-tech windows cause sun rays to bounce off and reflect onto adjacent vinyl siding clad buildings causing the siding to buckle; warp; or melt. These new window surfaces act like magnifying glasses concentrating the solar energy on a vinyl surface that cannot tolerate heat over 150 degrees Fahrenheit. This condition can occur when a window on the south elevation of the building is near a right angle corner wall covered in vinyl siding. It can even occur when a new commercial building is built across the street and its new glass wall façade faces the sun and reflects across the street to your vinyl sided property.

So what are you to do? This problem was rare in the past but now solar damage is occurring with increasing frequency due to the drive to install low-E windows. The Vinyl Siding Institute suggests placing awning or shades over the windows and even changing the landscaping to create shade trees to block the light. Some vinyl siding manufacturers are addressing this type of solar damage by adding a ‘thermal diffusion agent’ to the vinyl mix at the factory to help reflect and resist the heat build-up.

Manufacturers are also responding to the problem with vinyl siding by excluding solar refection or melt damage from their warranties. Their warranties always excluded damage from heat sources such as gas grills placed too close to the exterior wall, but now damage from reflective windows is recognized so it would be wise to read the fine print before selecting a siding brand.

Color Fading

This increasing problem is a sub-set of the solar melting problem. Whether it be due to window reflective energy; climate change; or changes in manufacturing, color fading complaints are becoming more prevalent. In the past, color fade was protected with a lifetime warranty by the manufacturer.

In the past, this warranty issue would be handled by a siding replacement policy. Now, some manufacturers are offering a ‘restore’ process instead of replacement. The ‘restore’ process would allow the manufacturer to paint the siding with an acrylic paint often applied by specialist painting contractors. This restore process comes with a 10-year warranty, down from the prior ‘limited-lifetime’ color warranty. Here again, read the fine print before signing the contract.

Installation

Vinyl siding may be quick to install, but it is not easy, if it is done right. Vinyl siding has an integral vinyl tab at the top in which an oval hole is punched at set intervals along its length to allow a nail to be driven through this hole and into the sheathing. Sounds simple, but it is not. The manufacturer specification requires the installer to drive the nail head within 1/32th of the vapor barrier/ sheathing surface so as not to bind the thermal movement of the siding.

Keep in mind the fasteners are being driven by an adjustable nail gun requiring a level of skill to properly set the nails in each slot hole without touching the vinyl. This accuracy requirement, coupled with today’s reduced numbers of skilled construction personnel, makes this a quality control challenge. If fastener binding does occur, the siding will not properly move with thermal expansion and buckling will soon appear on the surface.

So the answer to today’s vinyl siding problems: do your research. Read the manufacturer’s specifications and warranties; ensure your contractor is committed to good supervision of the installation of this important building envelope element; and finally, follow up with your own quality verification program, either through your building committee or project engineer. The siding is only as good as it is installed.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Article written by Jack Carr, P.E., R.S., LEED-AP, Criterium Engineers
Published in Condo Media September 2019 edition

Download a PDF Version of this Condo Media Article

The post Vinyl Siding – or Not appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Find Us at the Maine Condo Expo – September 21

Latest "Common Foundations" Article - Tue, 08/27/2019 - 14:31

As one of our valued homeowner association clients here in Maine, we want to let you know that the annual Maine Condo Expo and Forum is taking place on Saturday, September 21 from 8:00 – 2:30 pm.

The New England Chapter of the Community Associations Institute is presenting the event, one of several state-based events happening across New England. Criterium Engineers is one of the Portland event’s tabletop sponsors and we hope that we see you there.

Our own Jack Carr, P.E., senior vice president of engineering, is one of the featured speakers. Cole Smith, our vice president of business development, will also be on hand at our exhibit, to answer your questions about our homeowner association services such as reserve studies, transition studies, construction monitoring and other services.

The Maine Condo Expo and Forum  is for condominium board members and professional managers based in Maine. Please forward this message to others on your board or to a community manager who may be interested in attending. Registration is online.

Expo topics include:

  • Legal panel Q&A
    Condominium attorneys will address issues ranging from reasonable accommodations and rules
    enforcement to owner/resident challenges and board authority. Find out what gets boards in legal
    trouble and how you can avoid it.
  • Identify, Prioritize & Fund Association Projects
    Discover how to prioritize and fund capital improvement projects. Review strategies to address
    deferred maintenance and understand the legal risks in avoiding necessary maintenance.
  • Roundtable Discussions with Industry Professionals – A Program for Board Members
    Professionals will answer questions and address issues specific to Maine communities and their
    boards in this popular roundtable format.
  • Managers’ Forum – A Program for Association Managers
    This facilitated exchange of best practices will foster new ideas and creative approaches to the
    everyday challenges confronting managers.

The post Find Us at the Maine Condo Expo – September 21 appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

All-American Family LLC Purchases 1041 Brighton Avenue

Latest "Engineering Advisor" Article - Mon, 08/26/2019 - 08:57

A 24,150 square foot retail facility at 1041 Brighton Avenue in Portland, Maine, was recently purchased by All-American Family LLC. We congratulate the buyers as well as Charles Day of Porta & Co., who represented the seller, on the closing.

Criterium Engineers performed a Property Condition Assessment on the facility which includes a convenience store, restaurant and other mixed use tenants. The deal closed in mid-July.

The post All-American Family LLC Purchases 1041 Brighton Avenue appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Congratulations to Our Client: Hussey Seating Company

Latest "Engineering Advisor" Article - Mon, 08/26/2019 - 08:57

Congratulations to our client at Hussey Seating, global producer of spectator and audience seating, on their purchase of 90 Community Drive. Hussey purchased the 45,000 square foot building which is situated on 24.9 acres in Sanford, Maine, to expand their operations.

Criterium Engineers was engaged to perform a pre-purchase Property Condition Assessment as well as a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment which were conducted by Campbell Grant, P.E., senior engineer at Criterium Engineers corporate office. 

Hussey Seating began operations in 1835 and remains a family-owned business. Their products are installed across the globe in high school gymnasiums, tracks and football fields,  professional arenas, and performing arts centers. 

The post Congratulations to Our Client: Hussey Seating Company appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

A Pre-Lease Property Condition Assessment Pays For Itself!

Latest "Engineering Advisor" Article - Mon, 08/26/2019 - 08:57

Criterium Engineers provides the straightforward evaluation required for an extensive Pre-Lease Property Condition Assessment (PCA) for clients looking to lease buildings of all sizes. They are especially useful for Triple-Net Lease negotiations.

Be Informed!

Investing in due diligence and being an informed lessee provides greater confidence in the property, quantitative information for tenants, as well as peace of mind that the property will be appropriate for our client’s expectations.

  • Understand the property’s baseline condition
  • Solid information to make decisions on repairs or replacements, especially for Triple-Net Lessees
  • Detailed information to share with tenants
  • Saves time, money and establishes a baseline, which may minimize conflict with the building owner
  • Benefits all parties involved in the transaction
Request a Proposal! What is a Pre-Lease Property Condition Assessment?
  • Customized for the client’s business purpose
  • Used in support of real estate transactions
  • Commissioned for lease negotiations and, at times, upon termination
  • Provides an accurate condition of the asset
  • Offers an opinion on the building’s useful life
  • Outlines the probable costs required to repair or resolve any building issues
Details in a Customized Pre-Lease PCA Include
  • Representation of the property’s physical condition, including: property description, site improvements, and building systems
  • Outline of capital needs and opinion on probable costs: short-term repairs or replacements and preliminary capital budgets for the future
  • Recommendations for further study
  • Baseline data to resolve deficiencies and issues
  • Digital photography and informative reference exhibits/documents

Click here to view an outline of an example PCA.

Reports vary in length (often exceeding thirty pages) and are based on building size and complexity—for example a report prepared for a 35-story downtown office building, differs greatly from that for a 1,800 square foot retail space.

The average building PCA reviews more than 30 major building and site elements in great detail. It provides descriptions, deficiencies and recommendations. It also includes probable costs for repair or replacement of damaged or failing building systems or safety issues. PCA reports are customized for each client and may be designed to focus on areas that otherwise may not be covered in a baseline assessment.

What Does a Pre-Lease Property Condition Assessment Cost?

$4,000-6,000 (average) and long-term savings: tens of thousands (on average)

The post A Pre-Lease Property Condition Assessment Pays For Itself! appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers

Foundation Forensics

Latest "Your Home" Article - Fri, 08/16/2019 - 14:27

Cracks in foundations are by far the most common structural complaint raised in either reserve fund studies or transition studies.  They can occur in the youngest or newest condo building.  As condo documents usually assign the maintenance responsibility of their repair to the association, board members and property managers take them very seriously.  Maine condo buildings have many types of foundations including concrete block; brick; and mortared stone with the most common being poured concrete.

Most basements and garages have 4 to 6 inch concrete slabs and unless this is a slab-on-grade foundation, the slabs were poured independently of the foundation walls.  They are said to be ‘floating’.  Often the construction joint between the slab and wall can easily be seen.  The common slab crack complaint is hairline cracks appearing in spider web-like patterns.  These cracks can show up shortly after construction and are normally caused by shrinkage during the curing process.  The key point here is this type of slab cracking is rarely a structural problem, for after all, the slab could be completely removed leaving a dirt floor while the foundation walls and columns with footings will easily maintain a stable building.

Therefore, slab cracking is often more of a cosmetic problem.  Cracks are often repaired with a variety of grout, caulk, or epoxy products primarily to prevent groundwater penetration, insect entry, or radon gas infiltration.  Cracks showing differential movement on opposing surfaces can be a tripping hazard but more importantly an indication of serious sub-surface conditions needing further investigation.

Regarding foundation walls, the most typical problem with concrete walls are vertical hairline cracks, often starting at the top of the wall and traveling down to the floor slab.  A sub-set of these types of cracks are those that propagate often in a diagonal direction from stress concentration points such as the bottom corners of basement window openings.  The key point to remember is these types of cracks, even when they penetrate the entire thickness of the wall, normally do not constitute a structural problem as the loads from above pass unobstructed on both sides of the crack to the footings below.

However, when the wall surfaces on both sides of the crack are moving out of plane or the structure above shows stress in the form of movement or cracking sheetrock walls and ceilings above, further structural evaluation is warranted.  Foundation cracks should be sealed if periodic water infiltration occurs.  Repairing cracks from the outside if often the best method, but due to the excavation costs involved, repairing the crack from the interior by injecting a crack filling material has become a routine solution.

When horizontal wall cracks; multiple closely spaced vertical cracks; or large diagonal cracks in basement corners are observed, these conditions may indicate more serious problems related to settlement or other structural problems.  Similarly, a single vertical crack that is much wider at the top of the wall may indicated foundation settlement problems stemming from poor soil conditions; hydrostatic groundwater pressures; or frost heaving.  These problems should be directed to a knowledgeable consultant.

Regarding concrete block foundation walls, most of the guidance above can be used with some exceptions.  By their nature concrete block walls are often not well reinforced and are subject to inward movement from various soil pressures causing these types of walls can bulge inward.  Ice lens forming about 3 feet below the ground surface can expand and push concrete block walls inward.  This can even occur from a vehicle’s weight being too close to the foundation, such as oil delivery truck.  When horizontal cracking is observed in block walls, steps should be taken quickly to prevent further movement.  These types of walls are also very susceptible to water penetration even when foundation drains are present often requiring serious water proofing repairs.

The key to maintaining a sound brick or concrete block foundation is periodic vigilance to ensure loose or dislocated masonry elements are not ignored.  If you observe a ‘stair step’ patten crack in the mortar joints of a masonry foundation wall, it typically means settlement has occurred under the ‘step’ section of the wall. .  Any observed bulges or horizontal movement, as well as new cracks, should be quickly addressed.

Many Maine condominiums have been converted from old multi-family apartment buildings with mortared or un-mortared stone foundations, some with brick foundation walls above the ground surface.  These foundations have stood the test of time and are more than 100 years old and if well maintained can last another 100 years.  They are more likely to allow the entrance of ground water due to their porous nature and the necessary steps should be taken to protect the structural elements and indoor air quality of the building if high moisture is a problem.  Old foundations are like people.  As they age, they need some extra care but they have already met the test of time.

Download the PDF Version

The post Foundation Forensics appeared first on Criterium Engineers.

Categories: Criterium Engineers